Lock stock and barrel


Explanation: What is an idiom?

Everything. If you move, lock stock and barrel, it means you move completely and take everything with you.

Context:

"I bought a new set of spanners yesterday."

"Oh yeah, where from?"

"Over the internet. Carcrazy.com the place is called. Everything for the car, they've got."

"Did you pay online?"

"Yes of course."

"Oooh, you should be careful of those online companies you know."

"Why?"

"There was this report on the telly the other week about these companies who rip you off. You order stuff, they charge your credit card and then they never deliver it. They went to this site, bought a used car, and then it wasn't delivered. They then went to the actual address where the place was supposed to be, and they'd moved the lot. Lock stock and barrel."

"Do you think I should be worried then?"

"Where's this place based?"

"Freetown."

"Where's that?"

"Sierra Leone."

"Barman!"

Notes:

This phrase refers to guns. Traditionally, when you bought a gun you'd need three separate parts to it; the lock was used to hold the gun ready to fire; the stock is the part of the gun that the holds all the other parts together and provides a grip for the person shooting it; the barrel is the tube that the bullet goes through. In order to have the complete gun, you'd need to buy the lock, stock and barrel.

Category: l,weapons



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